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Finding Roots

Out of Africa



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<b>IDENTITY THEFT: </b><br><br>While some Sidis believe that their identity lies in their physical traits (nose and lips), others say there is only one true test - the son of a Sidi knows how to dance. (Right) Two friends at a Sidi wedding in Jamnagar, Gujarat, 2008

Out of Africa

May 4, 2013


IDENTITY THEFT:

While some Sidis believe that their identity lies in their physical traits (nose and lips), others say there is only one true test - the son of a Sidi knows how to dance. (Right) Two friends at a Sidi wedding in Jamnagar, Gujarat, 2008

<b>PAST FORWARD: </b><br><br>The community focuses more on its future and, except for a few very old Sidis, most don't have a real connection with Africa. (Above) View from a Sidi house in Mander village, which is just one street, 2008

Out of Africa

May 4, 2013


PAST FORWARD:

The community focuses more on its future and, except for a few very old Sidis, most don't have a real connection with Africa. (Above) View from a Sidi house in Mander village, which is just one street, 2008

<b>LIVING SOUL: </b><br><br>Most Sidi shrines are in honour of Bawa Ghor, a wealthy merchant who studied with Rifa'i Sufis in the Middle East. Each shrine is also a community gathering place. (Left) Patthar Kua colony dargah, Ahmedabad, 2009

Out of Africa

May 4, 2013


LIVING SOUL:

Most Sidi shrines are in honour of Bawa Ghor, a wealthy merchant who studied with Rifa'i Sufis in the Middle East. Each shrine is also a community gathering place. (Left) Patthar Kua colony dargah, Ahmedabad, 2009

<b>HIGH SPIRITS: </b><br><br>The Sidis celebrate Urs, an annual festival in honour of their saint Bawa Ghor. The celebrations that include communal cooking and feasting last for several days. (Left) Girls celebrate in Jambur village, Gujarat, 2006

Out of Africa

May 4, 2013


HIGH SPIRITS:

The Sidis celebrate Urs, an annual festival in honour of their saint Bawa Ghor. The celebrations that include communal cooking and feasting last for several days. (Left) Girls celebrate in Jambur village, Gujarat, 2006

<b>SACRED VOWS: </b><br><br>The Sidis marry within their community. Those who marry outside are expelled. (Above) Newlyweds, Tasneem and Ashraf, in Surendranagar, Gujarat, 2005

Out of Africa

May 4, 2013


SACRED VOWS:

The Sidis marry within their community. Those who marry outside are expelled. (Above) Newlyweds, Tasneem and Ashraf, in Surendranagar, Gujarat, 2005

<b>HAPPY FEET: </b><br><br>Sidi communities perform sacred dances to the rhythm of instruments. This dance is called the Goma, from the Swahili word 'ngoma', meaning both drum and dance. (Below) A Sidi dancer shatters a cocount on his head at a special performance, 2009

Out of Africa

May 4, 2013


HAPPY FEET:

Sidi communities perform sacred dances to the rhythm of instruments. This dance is called the Goma, from the Swahili word 'ngoma', meaning both drum and dance. (Below) A Sidi dancer shatters a cocount on his head at a special performance, 2009

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