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Cover Story

Amateur hour



Previous
<b>ON RECORD <br></b><br><br>It's a job they say anyone can do - and a number of people have decided to give journalism a shot without the hassle of training under crotchety editors. Ordinary people have turned citizen journalists by the dozen to report the news or comment on the day's developments. The best example of citizen journalists having access to and reporting from places that the traditional media could not reach was during the Arab Spring and Occupy protests of 2011. Technology has been the citizen journalist's best tool with websites, blogs, podcasts, video feeds and tweets helping people share news and views quickly and concisely. Some sites only use stories written by users, while many traditional news outlets now accept comments and reports from readers and viewers.

Amateur hour

February 2, 2013


ON RECORD


It's a job they say anyone can do - and a number of people have decided to give journalism a shot without the hassle of training under crotchety editors. Ordinary people have turned citizen journalists by the dozen to report the news or comment on the day's developments. The best example of citizen journalists having access to and reporting from places that the traditional media could not reach was during the Arab Spring and Occupy protests of 2011. Technology has been the citizen journalist's best tool with websites, blogs, podcasts, video feeds and tweets helping people share news and views quickly and concisely. Some sites only use stories written by users, while many traditional news outlets now accept comments and reports from readers and viewers.

<b>DR GOOGLE <br></b><br><br>Ideally, this job is best left to doctors. But with easy access to drug information websites that list the right dosage, possible side effects and other contraindications, people prefer to turn to Google instead of GP when they are sick. Is it safe to combine ibrufen with aspirin? Or, take NSAIDs if you are on beta-blockers ? WebMD. com, mims. com and medindia. com can give you detailed answers. Checking symptoms, too, has never been easier, or scarier. Hypochondriancs spend hours trawling Mayoclinic. com and WebMD to figure out every little itch, ache, sniffle and sneeze. No matter how convincing these do-ityourself medicine portals sound, please always see a doctor if you feel unwell. On the other hand, what you can trust to a large extent are the medical gadgets that now are so easily available both off and on internet. You can keep a tab on the number of calories you burn in a day by wearing a pedometer, check your blood sugar levels with glucose monitors and deal with respiratory problems with nebulizers.

Amateur hour

February 2, 2013


DR GOOGLE


Ideally, this job is best left to doctors. But with easy access to drug information websites that list the right dosage, possible side effects and other contraindications, people prefer to turn to Google instead of GP when they are sick. Is it safe to combine ibrufen with aspirin? Or, take NSAIDs if you are on beta-blockers ? WebMD. com, mims. com and medindia. com can give you detailed answers. Checking symptoms, too, has never been easier, or scarier. Hypochondriancs spend hours trawling Mayoclinic. com and WebMD to figure out every little itch, ache, sniffle and sneeze. No matter how convincing these do-ityourself medicine portals sound, please always see a doctor if you feel unwell. On the other hand, what you can trust to a large extent are the medical gadgets that now are so easily available both off and on internet. You can keep a tab on the number of calories you burn in a day by wearing a pedometer, check your blood sugar levels with glucose monitors and deal with respiratory problems with nebulizers.

<b>MAIN BHI COLUMBUS <br></b><br><br>The world is no longer explored by charting the waters and adventures not experienced with a pair of binoculars and a sextant. On a planet where every conceivable map has been made and every turn worth taking has been taken, travel today is absurdly easy. Travel agents have been replaced by websites that help you find hotels and B&Bs on other travellers' feedback. You can sift through online reviews, photos, tales of misadventures and navigation systems for practically every city. Review and community sites such as TripAdvisor and CouchSurfing enable you to interact with locals of your preferred destination and their indispensable tips. If all fails, GPS enabled smartphones can help you find the nearest restaurant or restroom. In fact, DIY journeys have taken the joy out of the serendipity of travel. The only kind of travel agent you might still need, though, is the one who can get you a tatkaal ticket on the Indian Railway.

Amateur hour

February 2, 2013


MAIN BHI COLUMBUS


The world is no longer explored by charting the waters and adventures not experienced with a pair of binoculars and a sextant. On a planet where every conceivable map has been made and every turn worth taking has been taken, travel today is absurdly easy. Travel agents have been replaced by websites that help you find hotels and B&Bs on other travellers' feedback. You can sift through online reviews, photos, tales of misadventures and navigation systems for practically every city. Review and community sites such as TripAdvisor and CouchSurfing enable you to interact with locals of your preferred destination and their indispensable tips. If all fails, GPS enabled smartphones can help you find the nearest restaurant or restroom. In fact, DIY journeys have taken the joy out of the serendipity of travel. The only kind of travel agent you might still need, though, is the one who can get you a tatkaal ticket on the Indian Railway.

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