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Shorts



Burke's Back He was a great mind of his time, wrote prose that was as clear as his conscience, and fearlessly condemned the rapacious colonialism of the East India Company. Now a new biography of Edmund Burke seeks to re-elevate the English thinker. According to the Financial Times, biographer Jesse Norman, a Conservative MP, aims to place Burke above Hume, Smith, Mill, Marx and Rawls. "Norman describes Burke's 'five great political battles' : for more equal treatment of Irish Catholics;against British oppression in the American colonies;for parliamentary restraints on monarchical power;against brutal exploitation by the East India Company;and, of course, against the ideas and actors of the French Revolution. . .  He supported Irish Catholics, American colonists and Indians because he felt that the British state and the East India Company had undermined the societies they were supposed to develop. He opposed the French revolutionaries because it was they who, in a bloody drop of the guillotine, had undermined theirs. " The spirit of the East India Company flourishes today in different forms, so it would serve the world well, to, in Edmund Burke's ringing words: "Remember, remember, remember!"

Burke's Back
He was a great mind of his time, wrote prose that was as clear as his conscience, and fearlessly condemned the rapacious colonialism of the East India Company. Now a new biography of Edmund Burke seeks to re-elevate the English thinker. According to the Financial Times, biographer Jesse Norman, a Conservative MP, aims to place Burke above Hume, Smith, Mill, Marx and Rawls. “Norman describes Burke's 'five great political battles' : for more equal treatment of Irish Catholics; against British oppression in the American colonies; for parliamentary restraints on monarchical power ; against brutal exploitation by the East India Company ; and, of course, against the ideas and actors of the French Revolution... He supported Irish Catholics, American colonists and Indians because he felt that the British state and the East India Company had undermined the societies they were supposed to develop. He opposed the French revolutionaries because it was they who, in a bloody drop of the guillotine, had undermined theirs.” The spirit of the East India Company flourishes today in different forms, so it would serve the world well, to, in Edmund Burke's ringing words: “Remember, remember, remember!”

Long goodbye
The Germans have just lost their longest word. The Rindfleischetikettierungsueberwachungsaufgabenuebertragungsgesetz is no more. It means 'law delegating beef label monitoring' and was introduced by the state in 1999 as part of measures against mad cow disease. Last week, the law was struck from the books because European Union regulations have changed. But lovers of long words shouldn't worry. The Germans have other equally interesting offerings. There's Donaudampfschifffahrtsgesellschaftskapitaenswitwe — meaning 'widow of a Danube steamboat company captain' . And Kraftfahrzeug-Haftpflichtversicherung for automobile liability insurance. And yes, the spell check just had a nervous breakdown.

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