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Photographs exhibition

Shorts




How Muslims saved Jews 

A new exhibition in London launched by a group of British Jews aims to celebrate the role Muslims played in saving Jewish lives during the Holocaust. The BBC reported that the Righteous Muslim Exhibition has photographs of 70 Muslims who sheltered Jews during World War II displayed alongside stories detailing their acts of courage. In one particularly moving story, the Hardaga family from Bosnia who provided shelter for the Jewish Kavilio family when German forces occupied Bosnia in 1943, were saved, half a century later, by the Kavilios during the Bosnian Civil War. In Jerusalem, Yad Vashem, Israel's official memorial to victims of the Holocaust, honours nearly 25, 000 so-called "righteous persons" - including Oscar Schindler - who risked their lives to protect the Jewish community during Nazi Germany's reign of terror. 

The King of Kowloon 

He was a rubbish collector who painted graffiti on Hong Kong's wall until he broke both legs - and then he painted on crutches. But Tsang Tsou-choi's dense black ink calligraphy that one plastered the island's public surfaces has almost all disappeared under the juggernaut of development. The self-declared 'King of Kowloon', Tsang Tsou-choi, lived in poverty but became a local hero and globally famous artist, creating around 55, 000 outdoor works until his death in 2007. Hong Kong's arts community is now fighting to preserve the vestiges of his public work. Tsang came to Hong Kong as a teenager from the southern Chinese province of Guangdong and started his graffiti career in the 1950s. Believing his ancestors once ruled the city's Kowloon district, his art depicts his royal family tree raging against colonial powers in bold columns of Chinese characters. Hopefully, Hong Kong will stop short of obliterating his idiosyncratic legacy.

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