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<br><b><br><br>Women & Love <br></b><br><br>The British novelist Martin Amis is known as much for his caustic and stylised prose as for the controversial throwaway remarks he makes in interviews. (Among them, that one needs to be brain-damaged in order to write children's books). In fact, he's a bit like the tetchy Naipual, who recently caused plenty of outrage when he said that women novelists just didn't match up to male ones. Well, Amis thinks that women outdo men when it comes to writing on sex. The writer, who was at the Hay-on-Wye Festival to discuss his novel, Lionel Asbo: State of England, told an audience that women are better at writing about sex than men. "Once a man is writing a sex scene he's feeling omnipotent . . .  but women don't, and they write better about it, " he said. He also said women write with more sincerity: "There's a bit more song in women's writing, there's more real sincerity in women's writing. " Amis' latest novel is a satire about a petty criminal who wins a fortune on the lottery. He now lives in the US and continues to moan about how his home country had become obsessed with celebrity culture.

Shorts

June 16, 2012





Women & Love


The British novelist Martin Amis is known as much for his caustic and stylised prose as for the controversial throwaway remarks he makes in interviews. (Among them, that one needs to be brain-damaged in order to write children's books). In fact, he's a bit like the tetchy Naipual, who recently caused plenty of outrage when he said that women novelists just didn't match up to male ones. Well, Amis thinks that women outdo men when it comes to writing on sex. The writer, who was at the Hay-on-Wye Festival to discuss his novel, Lionel Asbo: State of England, told an audience that women are better at writing about sex than men. "Once a man is writing a sex scene he's feeling omnipotent . . . but women don't, and they write better about it, " he said. He also said women write with more sincerity: "There's a bit more song in women's writing, there's more real sincerity in women's writing. " Amis' latest novel is a satire about a petty criminal who wins a fortune on the lottery. He now lives in the US and continues to moan about how his home country had become obsessed with celebrity culture.

<br><b><br><br>Speak, Memory <br></b><br><br>The US has a new poet laureate - Natasha Trethewey. Now a professor at Emory University in Atlanta, Trethewey's personal history informs her dark and moving poetry that deals with the African American civil rights struggle, poverty and race conflict. She's the daughter of a black woman and a white man who married at a time when many southern states forbade inter-race unions. They divorced a few years later. Trethewey first turned to poetry when she was in college, after her mother was killed by her stepfather. "I started writing poems as a response to that great loss, much the way that people responded, for example, after 9/11, : she told AP. Poetry is the only thing that can "speak the unspeakable". Her first collection, Domestic Work, was published in 2000, based on photographs of poor black Americans at work in the pre-civil rights 20th century, as well as her own family memories. A 1902 picture of washerwomen saw Trethewey write these beautiful lines: But in this photograph, women do not smile, their lips a steady line connecting each quiet face. They walk the road toward home, a week's worth of take-in laundry balanced on their heads lightly as church hats. Shaded by their loads, they do not squint, their ready gaze through him, to me, straight ahead.

Shorts

June 16, 2012





Speak, Memory


The US has a new poet laureate - Natasha Trethewey. Now a professor at Emory University in Atlanta, Trethewey's personal history informs her dark and moving poetry that deals with the African American civil rights struggle, poverty and race conflict. She's the daughter of a black woman and a white man who married at a time when many southern states forbade inter-race unions. They divorced a few years later. Trethewey first turned to poetry when she was in college, after her mother was killed by her stepfather. "I started writing poems as a response to that great loss, much the way that people responded, for example, after 9/11, : she told AP. Poetry is the only thing that can "speak the unspeakable". Her first collection, Domestic Work, was published in 2000, based on photographs of poor black Americans at work in the pre-civil rights 20th century, as well as her own family memories. A 1902 picture of washerwomen saw Trethewey write these beautiful lines: But in this photograph, women do not smile, their lips a steady line connecting each quiet face. They walk the road toward home, a week's worth of take-in laundry balanced on their heads lightly as church hats. Shaded by their loads, they do not squint, their ready gaze through him, to me, straight ahead.

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