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<br><b><br><br>Noodle Museum <br></b><br><br>The Japanese love their instant noodles and what better way to show the love than memorialise this modern culinary convenience? Cup Noodles Museum in Yokohama does just that. Established by the long and winding noodle empire of Nissin, whose founder Momofuku Ando created the cup noodle with its block of precooked noodles that needs only hot water and a sachet of flavouring to bring it to life, the museum allows visitors to learn about the history of this food and how it came to dominate the globe. Exhibits include giant replicas of Styrofoam cups through which people can walk. The most delectable item on offer is the chance to make your own noodles. Visitors can knead flour, roll out noodles, steam and fry them and then bag them and take them home. Ando said he was inspired to develop his noodle cups when he saw a long line of people waiting to buy soup noodles at a black market stall in post-war Japan. "Peace prevails when food suffices, " he said. This is Japan's second noodle museum. The first, located in Shinyokohama, was dedicated to Ramen noodles.

Shorts

September 24, 2011





Noodle Museum


The Japanese love their instant noodles and what better way to show the love than memorialise this modern culinary convenience? Cup Noodles Museum in Yokohama does just that. Established by the long and winding noodle empire of Nissin, whose founder Momofuku Ando created the cup noodle with its block of precooked noodles that needs only hot water and a sachet of flavouring to bring it to life, the museum allows visitors to learn about the history of this food and how it came to dominate the globe. Exhibits include giant replicas of Styrofoam cups through which people can walk. The most delectable item on offer is the chance to make your own noodles. Visitors can knead flour, roll out noodles, steam and fry them and then bag them and take them home. Ando said he was inspired to develop his noodle cups when he saw a long line of people waiting to buy soup noodles at a black market stall in post-war Japan. "Peace prevails when food suffices, " he said. This is Japan's second noodle museum. The first, located in Shinyokohama, was dedicated to Ramen noodles.

<br><b><br><br>Marquez in Iran <br></b><br><br>Literature has no borders and has the power to go places where journalism cannot. Both these truths are being ratified on the streets of Iran's capital, Tehran, where the South American Nobel-prize winning writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez' 1996 non-fiction, News of a Kidnapping, has sold out in a sudden surge of demand after the opposition leader Mir Hossein Mousavi said the book's description of Colombian 'diasppearances' was an accurate reflection of his life under house arrest. Marquez' work describes a series of kidnappings of highprofile Colombians, including journalists and politicians, on the orders of the Medellin drug thug Pablo Escobar. President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's regime put Mousavi, his wife, and fellow opposition leader Mehdi Karroubi under house arrest in February without a trial. Last week, after Mousavi issued a call to his countrymen to join the Arab Spring, thousands of Iranians poured onto the streets, and their first stop was the book store. The queues to buy Marquez' book reminded one astonished journalist of the flurry that follows the release of a Harry Potter novel.

Shorts

September 24, 2011





Marquez in Iran


Literature has no borders and has the power to go places where journalism cannot. Both these truths are being ratified on the streets of Iran's capital, Tehran, where the South American Nobel-prize winning writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez' 1996 non-fiction, News of a Kidnapping, has sold out in a sudden surge of demand after the opposition leader Mir Hossein Mousavi said the book's description of Colombian 'diasppearances' was an accurate reflection of his life under house arrest. Marquez' work describes a series of kidnappings of highprofile Colombians, including journalists and politicians, on the orders of the Medellin drug thug Pablo Escobar. President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's regime put Mousavi, his wife, and fellow opposition leader Mehdi Karroubi under house arrest in February without a trial. Last week, after Mousavi issued a call to his countrymen to join the Arab Spring, thousands of Iranians poured onto the streets, and their first stop was the book store. The queues to buy Marquez' book reminded one astonished journalist of the flurry that follows the release of a Harry Potter novel.

<br><b><br><br>Marx at Home <br></b><br><br>Karl Marx may have devoted his life to working for the empowerment of the masses, but his Marxism certainly did not start at home. Like many great men - Gandhi comes to mind - who expected their wife and children to fall in with their ideals and work for the greater common good while putting their own family's interests on the back burner, Marx expected and willingly received loyal support from his wife, three daughters and househelp, who was more like a family member, and with whom Marx fathered a son. Focusing on the deprivation and hardship within his cold and wet London home is a new biography called Love and Capital: Karl and Jenny Marx and The Birth of a Revolution by Mary Gabriel. Marx was not a cruel husband or father, just an utterly self-absorbed one. He and his wife had seven children, of which only three girls survived. Two of them killed themselves as a result of political and marital problems. Gabriel describes the father of communism as "an often shabby, poverty-stricken genius with a taste for the bottle". Readers will also be interested to know that it was while Karl and Jenny were on their honeymoon that he wrote one of his most famous lines: "Religion is the opium of the people. "

Shorts

September 24, 2011





Marx at Home


Karl Marx may have devoted his life to working for the empowerment of the masses, but his Marxism certainly did not start at home. Like many great men - Gandhi comes to mind - who expected their wife and children to fall in with their ideals and work for the greater common good while putting their own family's interests on the back burner, Marx expected and willingly received loyal support from his wife, three daughters and househelp, who was more like a family member, and with whom Marx fathered a son. Focusing on the deprivation and hardship within his cold and wet London home is a new biography called Love and Capital: Karl and Jenny Marx and The Birth of a Revolution by Mary Gabriel. Marx was not a cruel husband or father, just an utterly self-absorbed one. He and his wife had seven children, of which only three girls survived. Two of them killed themselves as a result of political and marital problems. Gabriel describes the father of communism as "an often shabby, poverty-stricken genius with a taste for the bottle". Readers will also be interested to know that it was while Karl and Jenny were on their honeymoon that he wrote one of his most famous lines: "Religion is the opium of the people. "

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