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Books

Quick review



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<b>THRILLER </b><br><br><b>Killing Hour </b><br><br><b>By Andrew Gross Harper </b><br><br><b>450 pages, Rs 299 </b><br><br>It's a tried and tested formula - a disturbing event in the life of a journeyman hero, his stumbling onto a conspiracy that stretches back over the decades, his unlikely triumph against the odds. Gross doesn't stray too far from it. In this case, the hero is Jay Handler, prosperous surgeon, whose bi-polar nephew commits suicide. Jay, of course, stumbles on to appropriately disturbing secrets concerning his brother's past with a dangerous cult. For what it's worth, it's adequately written even if the prose is rather flat at times. It's not a particularly fascinating read, but neither is it a terrible one.

Quick review

January 14, 2012


THRILLER

Killing Hour

By Andrew Gross Harper

450 pages, Rs 299

It's a tried and tested formula - a disturbing event in the life of a journeyman hero, his stumbling onto a conspiracy that stretches back over the decades, his unlikely triumph against the odds. Gross doesn't stray too far from it. In this case, the hero is Jay Handler, prosperous surgeon, whose bi-polar nephew commits suicide. Jay, of course, stumbles on to appropriately disturbing secrets concerning his brother's past with a dangerous cult. For what it's worth, it's adequately written even if the prose is rather flat at times. It's not a particularly fascinating read, but neither is it a terrible one.

<b>COLLECTION </b><br><br><b>Differential Diagnosis: Doctors on the Job </b><br><br><b>Edited by Leah Kaminsky </b><br><br><b>Hachette, 240 pages </b><br><br><b>Best Price: Rs 333 at shopping. indiatimes. com </b><br><br>This is a unique collection of short essays and stories written by practising doctors who are also authors, and write for magazines and papers. Atul Gawande is there, as is Oliver Sacks. The reader will be introduced to a fascinating world of sensibility that can exist in doctors only - seeing immense pain and suffering at close quarters, feeling both triumph and failure on a daily basis, fighting against the numbing work of caring for the sick, and being responsible for life and death. It's like looking behind the mask of bedside manners and finding humans just like you and me.

Quick review

January 14, 2012


COLLECTION

Differential Diagnosis: Doctors on the Job

Edited by Leah Kaminsky

Hachette, 240 pages

Best Price: Rs 333 at shopping. indiatimes. com

This is a unique collection of short essays and stories written by practising doctors who are also authors, and write for magazines and papers. Atul Gawande is there, as is Oliver Sacks. The reader will be introduced to a fascinating world of sensibility that can exist in doctors only - seeing immense pain and suffering at close quarters, feeling both triumph and failure on a daily basis, fighting against the numbing work of caring for the sick, and being responsible for life and death. It's like looking behind the mask of bedside manners and finding humans just like you and me.

<b>TRAVEL </b><br><br><b>Blue Guide India </b><br><br><b>By Sam Miller Penguin </b><br><br><b>888 pages, Rs 895 </b><br><br>When you think of travel guides you usually think Lonely Planet. But this book is a little different since it has been put together by Sam Miller, a Cambridge-trained historian and a long-time BBC journalist who has extensively travelled in South Asia. He is also the author of a book on Delhi, where he stays currently. So when he is talking about Mughal history or the ghats of Varanasi there is an extra ring of authority. The book is illustrated, though all of it is in black and white. A good one to have in your bag when you hit the road next time.

Quick review

January 14, 2012


TRAVEL

Blue Guide India

By Sam Miller Penguin

888 pages, Rs 895

When you think of travel guides you usually think Lonely Planet. But this book is a little different since it has been put together by Sam Miller, a Cambridge-trained historian and a long-time BBC journalist who has extensively travelled in South Asia. He is also the author of a book on Delhi, where he stays currently. So when he is talking about Mughal history or the ghats of Varanasi there is an extra ring of authority. The book is illustrated, though all of it is in black and white. A good one to have in your bag when you hit the road next time.

<b>TRANSLATION </b><br><br><b>The Elegance of the Hedgehog </b><br><br><b>By Muriel Barbery Full Circle </b><br><br><b>332 pages, Rs 295 </b><br><br>Everyone has some kind of secret life, and Renee is no different. She truly loves her cat Leo and lives for the television soap operas she watches avidly, but no one knows of her passion for Japanese culture, art, philosophy and music. They only see a dumpy caretaker of a posh hotel in Paris and hear her acid comments on everything. Until she meets Paloma, a precocious 12-year-old planning suicide, and Oza, a rich Japanese with a way of finding gold in everyone - or helping them discover it in themselves. A French bestseller translated into 40 languages.

Quick review

January 14, 2012


TRANSLATION

The Elegance of the Hedgehog

By Muriel Barbery Full Circle

332 pages, Rs 295

Everyone has some kind of secret life, and Renee is no different. She truly loves her cat Leo and lives for the television soap operas she watches avidly, but no one knows of her passion for Japanese culture, art, philosophy and music. They only see a dumpy caretaker of a posh hotel in Paris and hear her acid comments on everything. Until she meets Paloma, a precocious 12-year-old planning suicide, and Oza, a rich Japanese with a way of finding gold in everyone - or helping them discover it in themselves. A French bestseller translated into 40 languages.

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