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<b>THRILLER </b><br><br><b>Abandon </b><br><br><b>By Meg Cabot Macmillan </b><br><br><b>292 pages, Rs 299 </b><br><br>Meg Cabot too jumps on to the bandwagon of the undead. She, thankfully, can think beyond vampires and faeries. In Abandon, the first book in the trilogy, Cabot reworks the Greek myth of Hades and Persephone. Pierce Oliviera dies and goes to the underworld where she meets John, the death deity. Pierce manages to escape and come back to life, but she is never the same again. She unwittingly brings back the necklace John had given her to protect her from evil. Her troubles, however, are far from over as vengeful Furies want to kill the girl the death deity loves. Engaging story.

Quick review

July 16, 2011


THRILLER

Abandon

By Meg Cabot Macmillan

292 pages, Rs 299

Meg Cabot too jumps on to the bandwagon of the undead. She, thankfully, can think beyond vampires and faeries. In Abandon, the first book in the trilogy, Cabot reworks the Greek myth of Hades and Persephone. Pierce Oliviera dies and goes to the underworld where she meets John, the death deity. Pierce manages to escape and come back to life, but she is never the same again. She unwittingly brings back the necklace John had given her to protect her from evil. Her troubles, however, are far from over as vengeful Furies want to kill the girl the death deity loves. Engaging story.

<b>NON-FICTION </b><br><br><b>The Service of the State: The IAS Reconsidered </b><br><br><b>By Bhaskar Ghose Viking </b><br><br><b>306 pages, Rs 499 </b><br><br>Over the years, uncounted officers of the IAS (and its colonial predecessor) have written their memoirs - some mordant, some ponderous, some "like water willy-nilly flowing". Bhaskar Ghose attempts to escape from this genre by posing the question: is the IAS suited to govern the complex country that India is? He narrates his experiences right from the days in that nursery of IAS officers, St Stephen's, through his diverse postings, including the famous stint as Doordarshan's boss which was spectacularly cut short. His reminiscences lead him to a worthy conclusion - it can continue, provided the officers adapt.

Quick review

July 16, 2011


NON-FICTION

The Service of the State: The IAS Reconsidered

By Bhaskar Ghose Viking

306 pages, Rs 499

Over the years, uncounted officers of the IAS (and its colonial predecessor) have written their memoirs - some mordant, some ponderous, some "like water willy-nilly flowing". Bhaskar Ghose attempts to escape from this genre by posing the question: is the IAS suited to govern the complex country that India is? He narrates his experiences right from the days in that nursery of IAS officers, St Stephen's, through his diverse postings, including the famous stint as Doordarshan's boss which was spectacularly cut short. His reminiscences lead him to a worthy conclusion - it can continue, provided the officers adapt.

<b>SHORT STORIES </b><br><br><b>Adultery and other stories </b><br><br><b>By Farrukh Dhondy HarperCollins </b><br><br><b>265 pages, Rs 299 </b><br><br>Few writers have the wicked wit and the sly, sinister pun that Farrukh Dhondy brings to his craft. And in this fresh collection of short stories, the writer of Bombay Duck and Poona Company is in top form. The ensemble of characters that Dhondy brings to life is appealing: a failed poet who has been dumped by his wife, a small-town mathematics teacher and an Englishman waiting for a transplant. But Dhondy infuses them with perspective. The writer experiments with form too: a couple of stories are email exchanges. Most of the stories deal with the darker side of love.

Quick review

July 16, 2011


SHORT STORIES

Adultery and other stories

By Farrukh Dhondy HarperCollins

265 pages, Rs 299

Few writers have the wicked wit and the sly, sinister pun that Farrukh Dhondy brings to his craft. And in this fresh collection of short stories, the writer of Bombay Duck and Poona Company is in top form. The ensemble of characters that Dhondy brings to life is appealing: a failed poet who has been dumped by his wife, a small-town mathematics teacher and an Englishman waiting for a transplant. But Dhondy infuses them with perspective. The writer experiments with form too: a couple of stories are email exchanges. Most of the stories deal with the darker side of love.

REPORTAGE Hello Bastar By Rahul Pandita Tranquebar 212 pages, Rs 250 It is India's silent war. Swathes of India Invisible have become the centre of a brutal war between Maoists and the state that has left thousands dead. In recent times, several books have appeared on the Maoist movement. Pandita, however, enjoyed direct access to the Maoist leadership. This has enabled him to explain the movement from the Naxal's point of view. We come to know how the idea of creating a guerrilla base in Bastar came up, what the rebels who entered the jungles of Dandakaranya had to deal with and much more. Jailed Maoist ideologue Kobad Ghandy writes the afterword.

Quick review

July 16, 2011


REPORTAGE Hello Bastar By Rahul Pandita Tranquebar 212 pages, Rs 250 It is India's silent war. Swathes of India Invisible have become the centre of a brutal war between Maoists and the state that has left thousands dead. In recent times, several books have appeared on the Maoist movement. Pandita, however, enjoyed direct access to the Maoist leadership. This has enabled him to explain the movement from the Naxal's point of view. We come to know how the idea of creating a guerrilla base in Bastar came up, what the rebels who entered the jungles of Dandakaranya had to deal with and much more. Jailed Maoist ideologue Kobad Ghandy writes the afterword.

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