Quick review | Culture | Times Crest
Popular on Times Crest
  • In This Section
  • Entire Website
  • Spreading the Marathi word
    June 29, 2013
    Ideal Book Store, located just outside the perpetually crowded Dadar railway station is a go-to bookshop for Marathi literature.
  • Specialise to succeed
    June 29, 2013
    Despite its sudden closure in 2006, Lotus Books lives on in dog-eared snippets of memory among a certain section of Mumbai readers.
  • In here, it's always story time
    June 29, 2013
    Dayanita Singh launched an informal project on Facebook by asking her fellow photographers to document India's independent bookstores.
More in this Section
Profiles
Leaving tiger watching to raise rice Ecologist Debal Deb, who did his post-doctoral research from IISc in…
The crorepati writer He's the man who gives Big B his lines. RD Tailang, the writer of KBC.
Chennai-Toronto express Review Raja is a Canadian enthusiast whose quirky video reviews of Tamil…
Don't parrot, perform Maestro Buddhadev Dasgupta will hold a masterclass on ragas.
A man's man Shivananda Khan spent his life speaking up for men who have sex with men.
Bhowmick and the first family of Indian football At first glance, it would be the craziest set-up in professional football.
From Times Blogs
The end of Detroit
Jobs in Detroit's car factories are moving to India.
Chidanand Rajghatta
How I love the word ‘dobaara’...
Can ‘bindaas’ or ‘jhakaas’ survive transliteration?
Shobhaa De
Anand marte nahin...
India's first superstar died almost a lonely life.
Robin Roy
Books

Quick review



Previous
People Without History, By Jeremy Seabrook & Imran Ahmed Siddiqui Navayana, 257 pages, Rs 295 Writer Jeremy Seabrook collaborated with journalist Imran Siddiqui to study the lives of people in a few Muslim slums in Kolkata - Topsia, Beniapukur, Tiljala and Tangra. The result is this searing montage of stories on how India's biggest minority community survives in a city known for its tolerance. The sheer scale of poverty is surpassed only by the hopelessness of these ghettoes. Sadly, there is a dual incompleteness to this book - it doesn't tell us how other slum-dwellers live in Kolkata, nor does it venture beyond the bastis. It's a thin slice of life leaving many questions unanswered.

Quick review

June 4, 2011


People Without History, By Jeremy Seabrook & Imran Ahmed Siddiqui Navayana, 257 pages, Rs 295 Writer Jeremy Seabrook collaborated with journalist Imran Siddiqui to study the lives of people in a few Muslim slums in Kolkata - Topsia, Beniapukur, Tiljala and Tangra. The result is this searing montage of stories on how India's biggest minority community survives in a city known for its tolerance. The sheer scale of poverty is surpassed only by the hopelessness of these ghettoes. Sadly, there is a dual incompleteness to this book - it doesn't tell us how other slum-dwellers live in Kolkata, nor does it venture beyond the bastis. It's a thin slice of life leaving many questions unanswered.

Stories Short and Sweet, By Ruskin Bond Rupa, 87 pages, Rs 70. Like the spy who shares his surname, Ruskin Bond is growing stronger with age. The 12 very short stories in this slim volume are typical of the writer. Set in small towns, often the hills, they highlight extraordinary events in an otherwise humdrum life. Though it doesn't feature some of his masterpieces, stories of the supernatural like Pret in the House and Overcoat pack in plenty of drama and suspense. The protagonist in The Snake Charmer's Daughter takes control of her life and gets what she wants in a way only a Bond characters can. The Thief's Story is a touching tale.

Quick review

June 4, 2011


Stories Short and Sweet, By Ruskin Bond Rupa, 87 pages, Rs 70. Like the spy who shares his surname, Ruskin Bond is growing stronger with age. The 12 very short stories in this slim volume are typical of the writer. Set in small towns, often the hills, they highlight extraordinary events in an otherwise humdrum life. Though it doesn't feature some of his masterpieces, stories of the supernatural like Pret in the House and Overcoat pack in plenty of drama and suspense. The protagonist in The Snake Charmer's Daughter takes control of her life and gets what she wants in a way only a Bond characters can. The Thief's Story is a touching tale.

The East Indian Kitchen, By Michael Swamy Westland, 228 pages, Rs 395. Cuisines are not just markers of what we eat. They also tell stories of our historical journeys. They reveal our lineage and tell us who we are. Cordon Bleu chef Michael Swamy combines history with recipes to uncover the culinary secrets of Maharashtra-Portuguese fusion cuisine. The East Indian Kitchen is a thoughtful mix of the simple (Fresh green pea soup) and the exotic (Cutlets of Sheep's tongue). Of course, we also have the expected - fried Bombay Duck, grilled vindaloo. Swamy helpfully includes a section on cocktails. The book also provides details on how to make stock, spices and herbs.

Quick review

June 4, 2011


The East Indian Kitchen, By Michael Swamy Westland, 228 pages, Rs 395. Cuisines are not just markers of what we eat. They also tell stories of our historical journeys. They reveal our lineage and tell us who we are. Cordon Bleu chef Michael Swamy combines history with recipes to uncover the culinary secrets of Maharashtra-Portuguese fusion cuisine. The East Indian Kitchen is a thoughtful mix of the simple (Fresh green pea soup) and the exotic (Cutlets of Sheep's tongue). Of course, we also have the expected - fried Bombay Duck, grilled vindaloo. Swamy helpfully includes a section on cocktails. The book also provides details on how to make stock, spices and herbs.

Losing my virginity and other dumb ideas, By Madhuri Banerjee Penguin, 232 pages, Rs 150. Kaveri makes a vow on her 30th birthday. She will lose her virginity. You can guess how the story proceeds. Sample this: "He ran his fingers down my back slowly unzipping my gown. I unbuckled his belt, all the while kissing him. He was no longer surprised. He wanted me then. . .  I ran my nails down his chest. He had a smooth body and firm pecs. My heart started racing. This was the second man I would have sex with and I wasn't even in love with him. " This is a quickie, no pun intended, chick-lit. But Madhuri Banerjee engages. A fun read.

Quick review

June 4, 2011


Losing my virginity and other dumb ideas, By Madhuri Banerjee Penguin, 232 pages, Rs 150. Kaveri makes a vow on her 30th birthday. She will lose her virginity. You can guess how the story proceeds. Sample this: "He ran his fingers down my back slowly unzipping my gown. I unbuckled his belt, all the while kissing him. He was no longer surprised. He wanted me then. . . I ran my nails down his chest. He had a smooth body and firm pecs. My heart started racing. This was the second man I would have sex with and I wasn't even in love with him. " This is a quickie, no pun intended, chick-lit. But Madhuri Banerjee engages. A fun read.

Next

You Might Also Like

Other Times Group news sites
The Times of India | The Economic Times
इकनॉमिक टाइम्स | ઈકોનોમિક ટાઈમ્સ
Mumbai Mirror | Times Now
Indiatimes | नवभारत टाइम्स
महाराष्ट्र टाइम्स
Living and entertainment
Timescity | iDiva | Bollywood | Zoom
| Technoholik | MensXP.com

Networking

itimes | Dating & Chat | Email
Hot on the Web
Hotklix
Services
Book print ads | Online shopping | Business solutions | Book domains | Web hosting
Business email | Free SMS | Free email | Website design | CRM | Tenders | Remit
Cheap air tickets | Matrimonial | Ringtones | Astrology | Jobs | Property | Buy car
Online Deals
About us | Advertise with us | Terms of Use and Grievance Redressal Policy | Privacy policy | Feedback
Copyright© 2010 Bennett, Coleman & Co. Ltd. All rights reserved. For reprint rights: Times Syndication Service