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<b>FICTION </b><br><br><b>Sugar and Spice </b><br><br><b>By Lauren Conrad </b><br><br><b>HarperCollins </b><br><br><b>279 pages, Rs 250 </b><br><br>Stardom is not easy to manage and who knows that better than reality TV star Jane Roberts. Season 2 of LA Candy is about to begin and Jane must make peace with her past and her ex-best friend Madison Parker if she is to survive this time. Madison too must put aside her grand schemes to reach the top and first deal with the skeletons in her closet. In this peppy sequel to Sweet Little Lies, Lauren Conrad takes a look at the drama that goes on behind the cameras and all that lies beneath the glitz and glamour of showbiz. An easy read.

Quick review

May 7, 2011


FICTION

Sugar and Spice

By Lauren Conrad

HarperCollins

279 pages, Rs 250

Stardom is not easy to manage and who knows that better than reality TV star Jane Roberts. Season 2 of LA Candy is about to begin and Jane must make peace with her past and her ex-best friend Madison Parker if she is to survive this time. Madison too must put aside her grand schemes to reach the top and first deal with the skeletons in her closet. In this peppy sequel to Sweet Little Lies, Lauren Conrad takes a look at the drama that goes on behind the cameras and all that lies beneath the glitz and glamour of showbiz. An easy read.

<b>F </b><br><br><b>O </b><br><br><b>OD </b><br><br><b>Cook Easy Non Greasy </b><br><br><b>By Mary Abraham and Taisha Abraham </b><br><br><b>Rupa </b><br><br><b>162 pages, Rs 595 </b><br><br>Meals are no longer what they used to be. Often they are a quick bite between meetings, a take-away wrap on the way home or simply a glass of juice in the car. Which simply means that cooking needs to be redefined and, barring weekends, must surrender to the exigencies of time. This book is primarily for those who want to cook a healthy meal but don't want to listen to three classical ragas rustling it up. Dishes such as mushroom sautê here can be readied in 10 minutes flat. Not really a book for the gourmet, but a handy, if overpriced, tool for the eager beginner

Quick review

May 7, 2011


F

O

OD

Cook Easy Non Greasy

By Mary Abraham and Taisha Abraham

Rupa

162 pages, Rs 595

Meals are no longer what they used to be. Often they are a quick bite between meetings, a take-away wrap on the way home or simply a glass of juice in the car. Which simply means that cooking needs to be redefined and, barring weekends, must surrender to the exigencies of time. This book is primarily for those who want to cook a healthy meal but don't want to listen to three classical ragas rustling it up. Dishes such as mushroom sautê here can be readied in 10 minutes flat. Not really a book for the gourmet, but a handy, if overpriced, tool for the eager beginner

<b>TRANSLATION </b><br><br><b>In Freedom's Shade </b><br><br><b>By Anis Kidwai </b><br><br><b>Penguin </b><br><br><b>382 pages, Rs 450 </b><br><br>Translated from Urdu, this book is a moving account of Delhi and its environs in the first two tumultuous years after independence. Anis Kidwai had come to Delhi after her husband was murdered in Mussoorie. She along with Subhadra Joshi and others worked for giving relief to those who had suffered from Partition violence. Her valiant role in rescuing women abducted during the communal frenzy opens a window to little known aspects of a painful period. Kidwai's memories are rendered without frills, lifting this book above the crowd of Partition-related books. Rare personal photographs from the period are a bonus.

Quick review

May 7, 2011


TRANSLATION

In Freedom's Shade

By Anis Kidwai

Penguin

382 pages, Rs 450

Translated from Urdu, this book is a moving account of Delhi and its environs in the first two tumultuous years after independence. Anis Kidwai had come to Delhi after her husband was murdered in Mussoorie. She along with Subhadra Joshi and others worked for giving relief to those who had suffered from Partition violence. Her valiant role in rescuing women abducted during the communal frenzy opens a window to little known aspects of a painful period. Kidwai's memories are rendered without frills, lifting this book above the crowd of Partition-related books. Rare personal photographs from the period are a bonus.

<b>PHOTOGRAPHY </b><br><br><b>Manik Da </b><br><br><b>By Nemai Ghosh </b><br><br><b>HarperCollins </b><br><br><b>107 pages, Rs 199 </b><br><br>Satyajit Ray was called Manik Da by his friends and others who insisted they were close to him. This book is a tribute by photographer Nemai Ghosh, who worked as Ray's still photographer in several movies and also took perhaps his finest snapshots. In this thin volume, Ghosh recalls his association with the director beginning from Goopi Gyne Bagha Byne. Unfortunately, the tone is gushing and reminds you of a wide-eyed teenager writing an essay about his teacher. But the photographs, reproduced from the author's personal collection, are simply fabulous. For that alone, Ray fans might consider buying this book.

Quick review

May 7, 2011


PHOTOGRAPHY

Manik Da

By Nemai Ghosh

HarperCollins

107 pages, Rs 199

Satyajit Ray was called Manik Da by his friends and others who insisted they were close to him. This book is a tribute by photographer Nemai Ghosh, who worked as Ray's still photographer in several movies and also took perhaps his finest snapshots. In this thin volume, Ghosh recalls his association with the director beginning from Goopi Gyne Bagha Byne. Unfortunately, the tone is gushing and reminds you of a wide-eyed teenager writing an essay about his teacher. But the photographs, reproduced from the author's personal collection, are simply fabulous. For that alone, Ray fans might consider buying this book.

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