Quick review | Culture | Times Crest
Popular on Times Crest
  • In This Section
  • Entire Website
  • In here, it's always story time
    June 29, 2013
    Dayanita Singh launched an informal project on Facebook by asking her fellow photographers to document India's independent bookstores.
  • Specialise to succeed
    June 29, 2013
    Despite its sudden closure in 2006, Lotus Books lives on in dog-eared snippets of memory among a certain section of Mumbai readers.
  • Copy left and right?
    June 29, 2013
    Can the culture of copyright also be creatively crippling?
More in this Section
Profiles
Leaving tiger watching to raise rice Ecologist Debal Deb, who did his post-doctoral research from IISc in…
The crorepati writer He's the man who gives Big B his lines. RD Tailang, the writer of KBC.
Chennai-Toronto express Review Raja is a Canadian enthusiast whose quirky video reviews of Tamil…
Don't parrot, perform Maestro Buddhadev Dasgupta will hold a masterclass on ragas.
A man's man Shivananda Khan spent his life speaking up for men who have sex with men.
Bhowmick and the first family of Indian football At first glance, it would be the craziest set-up in professional football.
From Times Blogs
The end of Detroit
Jobs in Detroit's car factories are moving to India.
Chidanand Rajghatta
How I love the word ‘dobaara’...
Can ‘bindaas’ or ‘jhakaas’ survive transliteration?
Shobhaa De
Anand marte nahin...
India's first superstar died almost a lonely life.
Robin Roy
Books

Quick review



Previous
BIOGRAPHY Macaulay: The Tragedy of Power By Robert E Sullivan Orient BlackSwan 614 pages, Rs 795 Eminent Victorian historian, an architect of the narrative of British imperialism, author of India's penal code and educational reforms in the 19th century - Sullivan has succeeded in portraying all the brilliant complexity of Thomas Babington Macaulay. In engaging prose - not always easy in a biography - he shows how a man notorious in India for his infamous dismissal of Indian culture and scholarship and an advocate of ruthlessly imperial policies could also be the erudite humanist who opposed slavery all his life. And he does more, giving readers not just the man but the evolution of his political philosophy as well.

Quick review

February 26, 2011


BIOGRAPHY Macaulay: The Tragedy of Power By Robert E Sullivan Orient BlackSwan 614 pages, Rs 795 Eminent Victorian historian, an architect of the narrative of British imperialism, author of India's penal code and educational reforms in the 19th century - Sullivan has succeeded in portraying all the brilliant complexity of Thomas Babington Macaulay. In engaging prose - not always easy in a biography - he shows how a man notorious in India for his infamous dismissal of Indian culture and scholarship and an advocate of ruthlessly imperial policies could also be the erudite humanist who opposed slavery all his life. And he does more, giving readers not just the man but the evolution of his political philosophy as well.

HISTORY Sexual and Gender Representations in Mughal India By Syed Mubin Zehra Manak 191 pages, Rs 600 Love affairs in the harem of Mughal emperors have often been gleefully recounted in the accounts of medieval foreign travellers. Jahan Ara, Shah Jahan's favourite daughter, was known to have an impressive bunch of secret paramours. It is also said that her younger sister Raushan Ara, after having grown tired of an inamorato, even conspired to get him caught. Syed Mubin Zehra uses such juicy narratives to explore sexual and gender representation in 17th century India. The book suggests there was a duality in the medieval state's attitudes towards women: what was written in the law wasn't necessarily practised.

Quick review

February 26, 2011


HISTORY Sexual and Gender Representations in Mughal India By Syed Mubin Zehra Manak 191 pages, Rs 600 Love affairs in the harem of Mughal emperors have often been gleefully recounted in the accounts of medieval foreign travellers. Jahan Ara, Shah Jahan's favourite daughter, was known to have an impressive bunch of secret paramours. It is also said that her younger sister Raushan Ara, after having grown tired of an inamorato, even conspired to get him caught. Syed Mubin Zehra uses such juicy narratives to explore sexual and gender representation in 17th century India. The book suggests there was a duality in the medieval state's attitudes towards women: what was written in the law wasn't necessarily practised.

TRIVIA Cricket! All you wanted to know about the World Cup By Diptakirti Chaudhuri Puffin 140 pages, Rs 199 Cricket, before Indian Premier League changed its DNA, wasn't just about counting the zeroes in a batsman's weekly paycheque. It was fun, real fun. Over a cup of tea, aging uncles would ask questions such as whom did West Indian legend Garfield Sobers clobber for six sixes in an over in the English County league? A smart young nephew would immediately answer: Malcolm Nash. This book is partly a throwback to those days of innocence. Loaded with cricket trivia, neatly written and peppered with humour, it is quite a page-turner. Go for it, if you are a cricket buff.

Quick review

February 26, 2011


TRIVIA Cricket! All you wanted to know about the World Cup By Diptakirti Chaudhuri Puffin 140 pages, Rs 199 Cricket, before Indian Premier League changed its DNA, wasn't just about counting the zeroes in a batsman's weekly paycheque. It was fun, real fun. Over a cup of tea, aging uncles would ask questions such as whom did West Indian legend Garfield Sobers clobber for six sixes in an over in the English County league? A smart young nephew would immediately answer: Malcolm Nash. This book is partly a throwback to those days of innocence. Loaded with cricket trivia, neatly written and peppered with humour, it is quite a page-turner. Go for it, if you are a cricket buff.

FICTION Show Me A Hero By Aditya Sudarshan Rupa 294 pages, Rs 195 Prashant Padmanabhan has just finished college. He wants to make a movie about his hero, a cricketer whose career has nose-dived after an unsavoury controversy. His former classmate Vaibhav agrees to help him. But the two soon realise that they have entered a dangerous world where anything can happen. It is the season of cricket and even novels have joined the party. Young author Aditya Sudarshan's work revolves around cricket, murder and a youth's courage to fight the odds. Appealing in parts, Show Me A Hero would have been far more gripping if edited by 50 pages.

Quick review

February 26, 2011


FICTION Show Me A Hero By Aditya Sudarshan Rupa 294 pages, Rs 195 Prashant Padmanabhan has just finished college. He wants to make a movie about his hero, a cricketer whose career has nose-dived after an unsavoury controversy. His former classmate Vaibhav agrees to help him. But the two soon realise that they have entered a dangerous world where anything can happen. It is the season of cricket and even novels have joined the party. Young author Aditya Sudarshan's work revolves around cricket, murder and a youth's courage to fight the odds. Appealing in parts, Show Me A Hero would have been far more gripping if edited by 50 pages.

Next
Other Times Group news sites
The Times of India | The Economic Times
इकनॉमिक टाइम्स | ઈકોનોમિક ટાઈમ્સ
Mumbai Mirror | Times Now
Indiatimes | नवभारत टाइम्स
महाराष्ट्र टाइम्स
Living and entertainment
Timescity | iDiva | Bollywood | Zoom
| Technoholik | MensXP.com

Networking

itimes | Dating & Chat | Email
Hot on the Web
Hotklix
Services
Book print ads | Online shopping | Business solutions | Book domains | Web hosting
Business email | Free SMS | Free email | Website design | CRM | Tenders | Remit
Cheap air tickets | Matrimonial | Ringtones | Astrology | Jobs | Property | Buy car
Online Deals
About us | Advertise with us | Terms of Use and Grievance Redressal Policy | Privacy policy | Feedback
Copyright© 2010 Bennett, Coleman & Co. Ltd. All rights reserved. For reprint rights: Times Syndication Service