Quick review | Culture | Times Crest
Popular on Times Crest
  • In This Section
  • Entire Website
  • Tossed, by a new flood
    June 29, 2013
    This bookstore boasts a clientele that once included Jawaharlal Nehru, Rajendra Prasad, Yashwantrao Chavan and CV Raman.
  • In here, it's always story time
    June 29, 2013
    Dayanita Singh launched an informal project on Facebook by asking her fellow photographers to document India's independent bookstores.
  • Specialise to succeed
    June 29, 2013
    Despite its sudden closure in 2006, Lotus Books lives on in dog-eared snippets of memory among a certain section of Mumbai readers.
More in this Section
Profiles
Leaving tiger watching to raise rice Ecologist Debal Deb, who did his post-doctoral research from IISc in…
The crorepati writer He's the man who gives Big B his lines. RD Tailang, the writer of KBC.
Chennai-Toronto express Review Raja is a Canadian enthusiast whose quirky video reviews of Tamil…
Don't parrot, perform Maestro Buddhadev Dasgupta will hold a masterclass on ragas.
A man's man Shivananda Khan spent his life speaking up for men who have sex with men.
Bhowmick and the first family of Indian football At first glance, it would be the craziest set-up in professional football.
From Times Blogs
The end of Detroit
Jobs in Detroit's car factories are moving to India.
Chidanand Rajghatta
How I love the word ‘dobaara’...
Can ‘bindaas’ or ‘jhakaas’ survive transliteration?
Shobhaa De
Anand marte nahin...
India's first superstar died almost a lonely life.
Robin Roy
Books

Quick review



Previous
HEALTH Women and the Weight Loss Tamasha By Rujuta Diwekar Westland 374 pages, Rs 200 Mumbai-based Rujuta Diwekar's first book, Don't Lose Your Mind, Lose Your Weight, has acquired near-cult status. Celebrities she has worked with include Anil Ambani, Preity Zinta and Kareena Kapoor, who has also penned a handwritten note for this book. Reading her latest book one realises why she is being lionised. Diwekar writes in an entertaining, feel-good style. Her way of losing weight doesn't mean starving but intelligent eating. But, more importantly, she understands the Indian middleclass woman. This book deals with her four strategies - nutrition, exercise, sleep and relationships - to a healthy life. Another winner.

Quick review

January 22, 2011


HEALTH Women and the Weight Loss Tamasha By Rujuta Diwekar Westland 374 pages, Rs 200 Mumbai-based Rujuta Diwekar's first book, Don't Lose Your Mind, Lose Your Weight, has acquired near-cult status. Celebrities she has worked with include Anil Ambani, Preity Zinta and Kareena Kapoor, who has also penned a handwritten note for this book. Reading her latest book one realises why she is being lionised. Diwekar writes in an entertaining, feel-good style. Her way of losing weight doesn't mean starving but intelligent eating. But, more importantly, she understands the Indian middleclass woman. This book deals with her four strategies - nutrition, exercise, sleep and relationships - to a healthy life. Another winner.

Nanovation: How a Little Car Can Teach the World to Think Big By Kevin and Jackie Freiburg and Dain Dunston Portfolio 367 pages, Rs 450 Business consultants and bestseller author couple Kevin and Jackie Freiberg join up with creative writer Dain Dunston to turn the Nano story into a business lesson. Running through the seemingly insurmountable odds faced by Tata Motors and describing how they were overcome by asking 'what if?' and 'why not?' Nanovation claims that the Nano experience has started a cultural renaissance in business thinking. Long-held management dogmas are being challenged and outdated systems jettisoned so that products and services can be delivered at fractional costs. Racy and well-researched.

Quick review

January 22, 2011


Nanovation: How a Little Car Can Teach the World to Think Big By Kevin and Jackie Freiburg and Dain Dunston Portfolio 367 pages, Rs 450 Business consultants and bestseller author couple Kevin and Jackie Freiberg join up with creative writer Dain Dunston to turn the Nano story into a business lesson. Running through the seemingly insurmountable odds faced by Tata Motors and describing how they were overcome by asking 'what if?' and 'why not?' Nanovation claims that the Nano experience has started a cultural renaissance in business thinking. Long-held management dogmas are being challenged and outdated systems jettisoned so that products and services can be delivered at fractional costs. Racy and well-researched.

<b>CHILDREN </b><br><br><b>Flute in the Forest </b><br><br><b>By Leela Gour Broome Puffin </b><br><br><b>192 pages, Rs 199 </b><br><br>Flute in the Forest is the story of 13-year-old Atiya set in a small village near a forest. Raised by a single father who's a forest officer, she shares a special bond with animals and often takes off for treks by herself. It's a story of her growing up and realising her dreams. The tribals in the novel are portrayed with sensitivity. However, certain bits seem formulaic. Broome needn't have compounded the protagonists troubles by making her suffer from polio and grow up friendless with an absent mother. That is too stereotypical. Ruskin Bond recommends this book as a charming story. We disagree.

Quick review

January 22, 2011


CHILDREN

Flute in the Forest

By Leela Gour Broome Puffin

192 pages, Rs 199

Flute in the Forest is the story of 13-year-old Atiya set in a small village near a forest. Raised by a single father who's a forest officer, she shares a special bond with animals and often takes off for treks by herself. It's a story of her growing up and realising her dreams. The tribals in the novel are portrayed with sensitivity. However, certain bits seem formulaic. Broome needn't have compounded the protagonists troubles by making her suffer from polio and grow up friendless with an absent mother. That is too stereotypical. Ruskin Bond recommends this book as a charming story. We disagree.

Mice in Men By Anirban Bose HarperCollins 212 pages, Rs 199 After reading the first couple of short stories, it is easy to predict how the remaining eight stories in this book will begin, unfold and end. The author has a proclivity for long-winded descriptions, which always doesn't go well in the short story format. Being a doctor himself, Anirban Bose unsurprisingly does better on tales that are knitted around the medical profession. Neologism and Stockholm Syndrome are the pick of the lot although their endings are a little forced. The title story is in parts amusing. Can at best be recommended for reading on boring train rides or at the airport.

Quick review

January 22, 2011


Mice in Men By Anirban Bose HarperCollins 212 pages, Rs 199 After reading the first couple of short stories, it is easy to predict how the remaining eight stories in this book will begin, unfold and end. The author has a proclivity for long-winded descriptions, which always doesn't go well in the short story format. Being a doctor himself, Anirban Bose unsurprisingly does better on tales that are knitted around the medical profession. Neologism and Stockholm Syndrome are the pick of the lot although their endings are a little forced. The title story is in parts amusing. Can at best be recommended for reading on boring train rides or at the airport.

Next
Other Times Group news sites
The Times of India | The Economic Times
इकनॉमिक टाइम्स | ઈકોનોમિક ટાઈમ્સ
Mumbai Mirror | Times Now
Indiatimes | नवभारत टाइम्स
महाराष्ट्र टाइम्स
Living and entertainment
Timescity | iDiva | Bollywood | Zoom
| Technoholik | MensXP.com

Networking

itimes | Dating & Chat | Email
Hot on the Web
Hotklix
Services
Book print ads | Online shopping | Business solutions | Book domains | Web hosting
Business email | Free SMS | Free email | Website design | CRM | Tenders | Remit
Cheap air tickets | Matrimonial | Ringtones | Astrology | Jobs | Property | Buy car
Online Deals
About us | Advertise with us | Terms of Use and Grievance Redressal Policy | Privacy policy | Feedback
Copyright© 2010 Bennett, Coleman & Co. Ltd. All rights reserved. For reprint rights: Times Syndication Service