Quick review | Culture | Times Crest
Popular on Times Crest
  • In This Section
  • Entire Website
  • Tossed, by a new flood
    June 29, 2013
    This bookstore boasts a clientele that once included Jawaharlal Nehru, Rajendra Prasad, Yashwantrao Chavan and CV Raman.
  • In here, it's always story time
    June 29, 2013
    Dayanita Singh launched an informal project on Facebook by asking her fellow photographers to document India's independent bookstores.
  • Specialise to succeed
    June 29, 2013
    Despite its sudden closure in 2006, Lotus Books lives on in dog-eared snippets of memory among a certain section of Mumbai readers.
More in this Section
Profiles
Leaving tiger watching to raise rice Ecologist Debal Deb, who did his post-doctoral research from IISc in…
The crorepati writer He's the man who gives Big B his lines. RD Tailang, the writer of KBC.
Chennai-Toronto express Review Raja is a Canadian enthusiast whose quirky video reviews of Tamil…
Don't parrot, perform Maestro Buddhadev Dasgupta will hold a masterclass on ragas.
A man's man Shivananda Khan spent his life speaking up for men who have sex with men.
Bhowmick and the first family of Indian football At first glance, it would be the craziest set-up in professional football.
From Times Blogs
The end of Detroit
Jobs in Detroit's car factories are moving to India.
Chidanand Rajghatta
How I love the word ‘dobaara’...
Can ‘bindaas’ or ‘jhakaas’ survive transliteration?
Shobhaa De
Anand marte nahin...
India's first superstar died almost a lonely life.
Robin Roy
Books

Quick review



Previous
FICTION Sin Tropez By Aita Ighodaro Corvus 380 pages, Rs 299 This is a book about the rich, jet-set crowd and their somewhat absurd lives. Characters are flown in and out of parties, an obscenely rich guy with a yacht is the ticket to a girl's dream, friends call each other 'darling' and brand names are sprinkled like seasoning. Sin Tropez is meant to be sexy, amoral. It tries to be cheeky and daring. But it only elicits eye rolls. The writing doesn't help. There's giddy school girl (" There, dancing on a table under the stars with this man, nothing mattered" ) and plain corny - a red Lamborghini is an "open-topped love machine. " Please.

Quick review

December 25, 2010


FICTION Sin Tropez By Aita Ighodaro Corvus 380 pages, Rs 299 This is a book about the rich, jet-set crowd and their somewhat absurd lives. Characters are flown in and out of parties, an obscenely rich guy with a yacht is the ticket to a girl's dream, friends call each other 'darling' and brand names are sprinkled like seasoning. Sin Tropez is meant to be sexy, amoral. It tries to be cheeky and daring. But it only elicits eye rolls. The writing doesn't help. There's giddy school girl (" There, dancing on a table under the stars with this man, nothing mattered" ) and plain corny - a red Lamborghini is an "open-topped love machine. " Please.

NON-FICTION Wrong By David H Freedman Hachette 295 pages, Rs 595 Wondering why your stocks are down despite your broker's assurances? Or, why you can't seem to shake off the sniffles regardless of your physician's upbeat diagnosis? Then David H Freedman's Wrong is just the book for you. Written with a healthy dose of wit and sarcasm, Freedman not only exposes the unsavory truth about 'expert' opinions and studies but also our folly for falling for them. The book is particularly sceptical of informal experts - mechanics, talent scouts, lifestyle gurus, etc - and provides solid reasoning for the same. A good read for lovers of the Freakonomics genre.

Quick review

December 25, 2010


NON-FICTION Wrong By David H Freedman Hachette 295 pages, Rs 595 Wondering why your stocks are down despite your broker's assurances? Or, why you can't seem to shake off the sniffles regardless of your physician's upbeat diagnosis? Then David H Freedman's Wrong is just the book for you. Written with a healthy dose of wit and sarcasm, Freedman not only exposes the unsavory truth about 'expert' opinions and studies but also our folly for falling for them. The book is particularly sceptical of informal experts - mechanics, talent scouts, lifestyle gurus, etc - and provides solid reasoning for the same. A good read for lovers of the Freakonomics genre.

FILM Asian Film Journeys By Rashmi Doraiswamy and Latika Padgaonkar Wisdom Tree 640 pages, Rs 1495 Between the years 1988-2004, Cinemaya became a vigorous platform for writings on Asian cinema. From sex in Indonesian movies to the aesthetics and politics of Iranian cinema in exile, from the Devdas syndrome in Indian films to documentaries in Pakistan, the magazine had space for everything. Those insightful essays and reports showed the varying and the unifying patterns of Asian cinema. This book is a collection of the best essays published in the magazine. And the passage of years notwithstanding, they remain relevant as document and as reference material. Indispensable for any serious cinema buff.

Quick review

December 25, 2010


FILM Asian Film Journeys By Rashmi Doraiswamy and Latika Padgaonkar Wisdom Tree 640 pages, Rs 1495 Between the years 1988-2004, Cinemaya became a vigorous platform for writings on Asian cinema. From sex in Indonesian movies to the aesthetics and politics of Iranian cinema in exile, from the Devdas syndrome in Indian films to documentaries in Pakistan, the magazine had space for everything. Those insightful essays and reports showed the varying and the unifying patterns of Asian cinema. This book is a collection of the best essays published in the magazine. And the passage of years notwithstanding, they remain relevant as document and as reference material. Indispensable for any serious cinema buff.

TRANSLATION What Really Happened By Banaphool Penguin 327 pages, Rs 299 Balai Mukhopadhyay, who used the pen name Banaphool, was the master of the short story in Bengali. Very short, to be precise. Some tales barely run into 300 words, others even less. And yet, they are always complete and perfect;adding even a single word to them appears unnecessary. Sample the best of this Bihar-born writer who has been translated into English for the first time. The richly-evocative stories illustrate a moment, a memory, an incident or an idea while exploring the human condition and life's cruelty. Read A Novel in Brief, The Tailor, Amala and others. You'll love them.

Quick review

December 25, 2010


TRANSLATION What Really Happened By Banaphool Penguin 327 pages, Rs 299 Balai Mukhopadhyay, who used the pen name Banaphool, was the master of the short story in Bengali. Very short, to be precise. Some tales barely run into 300 words, others even less. And yet, they are always complete and perfect;adding even a single word to them appears unnecessary. Sample the best of this Bihar-born writer who has been translated into English for the first time. The richly-evocative stories illustrate a moment, a memory, an incident or an idea while exploring the human condition and life's cruelty. Read A Novel in Brief, The Tailor, Amala and others. You'll love them.

Next
Other Times Group news sites
The Times of India | The Economic Times
इकनॉमिक टाइम्स | ઈકોનોમિક ટાઈમ્સ
Mumbai Mirror | Times Now
Indiatimes | नवभारत टाइम्स
महाराष्ट्र टाइम्स
Living and entertainment
Timescity | iDiva | Bollywood | Zoom
| Technoholik | MensXP.com

Networking

itimes | Dating & Chat | Email
Hot on the Web
Hotklix
Services
Book print ads | Online shopping | Business solutions | Book domains | Web hosting
Business email | Free SMS | Free email | Website design | CRM | Tenders | Remit
Cheap air tickets | Matrimonial | Ringtones | Astrology | Jobs | Property | Buy car
Online Deals
About us | Advertise with us | Terms of Use and Grievance Redressal Policy | Privacy policy | Feedback
Copyright© 2010 Bennett, Coleman & Co. Ltd. All rights reserved. For reprint rights: Times Syndication Service