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Books

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<b>Accused </b><br><br>By Mark Gimenez Sphere <b><br><br>562 </b><br><br>pages, <b><br><br>Rs </b><br><br>295 Anyone who likes legal thrillers of the John Grisham variety will enjoy Mark Gimenez. Like Grisham, Gimenez's plots are driven by surprises and twists, while the stakes are much higher than what one can possibly imagine at the beginning of the book. What's more, the Texan lawyer, A Scott Fenney, grips our interest with his mind games, and we are compelled to turn one page after another to discover where the story is headed. Gimenez is in good form in Accused. He is equally good in the companion book, The Color of Law. Unputdownable for those who love the genre.

Quick Review

August 7, 2010


Accused

By Mark Gimenez Sphere

562


pages,

Rs


295 Anyone who likes legal thrillers of the John Grisham variety will enjoy Mark Gimenez. Like Grisham, Gimenez's plots are driven by surprises and twists, while the stakes are much higher than what one can possibly imagine at the beginning of the book. What's more, the Texan lawyer, A Scott Fenney, grips our interest with his mind games, and we are compelled to turn one page after another to discover where the story is headed. Gimenez is in good form in Accused. He is equally good in the companion book, The Color of Law. Unputdownable for those who love the genre.

<b>Michelle Obama: First Lady of Hope </b><br><br>By Elizabeth Lightfoot The Globe Pequot Press <b><br><br>240 </b><br><br>pages, <b><br><br>Rs </b><br><br>295 Michelle Obama's journey from the south side Chicago to the White House has been as epic as her husband's rise. First Lady of Hope is remarkable in the way that it reverse-engineers Michelle's life from a massive body of newspaper articles, TV interviews and press reports. It chronicles Michelle's life from her student days, when she was a brilliant Black student in Ivy League colleges, to her stint at a top-notch law firm where she would meet her future husband. Yet, the book is missing the warmth of a personal account as the author was unable to interview Michelle.

Quick Review

August 7, 2010


Michelle Obama: First Lady of Hope

By Elizabeth Lightfoot The Globe Pequot Press

240


pages,

Rs


295 Michelle Obama's journey from the south side Chicago to the White House has been as epic as her husband's rise. First Lady of Hope is remarkable in the way that it reverse-engineers Michelle's life from a massive body of newspaper articles, TV interviews and press reports. It chronicles Michelle's life from her student days, when she was a brilliant Black student in Ivy League colleges, to her stint at a top-notch law firm where she would meet her future husband. Yet, the book is missing the warmth of a personal account as the author was unable to interview Michelle.

<b>Delhi Calm </b><br><br>By Vishwajyoti Ghosh HarperCollins <b><br><br>246 </b><br><br>pages, <b><br><br>Rs </b><br><br>499 For an epochal period in India's post-Independence history - and given the power of fiction to take an unsparing look at our past - the Emergency has received surprisingly little play in books or films. Ghosh goes some way towards amending that with his graphic novel, taking a look at the internal lives and external struggles of three reluctant comrades in their bid to face off against the state's oppression. Its writing perceptive and shot through with wry humour and the artwork, although rough-edged, successful in evoking sepia-toned memories of the 1970s, Delhi Calm achieves what it has set out to do.

Quick Review

August 7, 2010


Delhi Calm

By Vishwajyoti Ghosh HarperCollins

246


pages,

Rs


499 For an epochal period in India's post-Independence history - and given the power of fiction to take an unsparing look at our past - the Emergency has received surprisingly little play in books or films. Ghosh goes some way towards amending that with his graphic novel, taking a look at the internal lives and external struggles of three reluctant comrades in their bid to face off against the state's oppression. Its writing perceptive and shot through with wry humour and the artwork, although rough-edged, successful in evoking sepia-toned memories of the 1970s, Delhi Calm achieves what it has set out to do.

<b>The Truth About Me </b><br><br>A Revathi Penguin <b><br><br>304 </b><br><br>pages, <b><br><br>Rs </b><br><br>299 Revathi started life as Doraisamy. The youngest son in a family of lorry drivers, he identified with and considered himself a girl. A grim life awaited him - running away from home, induction into the community of hijras, sex change operation, begging, collecting money from shopkeepers and prostitution. But once she turns woman, Revathi is able to turn her life around and become an activist. Though an autobiography, The Truth About Me is designed to educate the public about hijra life. It's interesting and informative, but lacks the humour and attention to minutiae that make an autobiography a truly engrossing read.

Quick Review

August 7, 2010


The Truth About Me

A Revathi Penguin

304


pages,

Rs


299 Revathi started life as Doraisamy. The youngest son in a family of lorry drivers, he identified with and considered himself a girl. A grim life awaited him - running away from home, induction into the community of hijras, sex change operation, begging, collecting money from shopkeepers and prostitution. But once she turns woman, Revathi is able to turn her life around and become an activist. Though an autobiography, The Truth About Me is designed to educate the public about hijra life. It's interesting and informative, but lacks the humour and attention to minutiae that make an autobiography a truly engrossing read.

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