Full screen | Culture | Times Crest
Popular on Times Crest
  • In This Section
  • Entire Website
  • The Bollywood Hard-sell
    June 29, 2013
    Whether it's playing housie with housewives or spooking journos with fake ghosts, the Bollywood hype machine is in top gear.
  • No foreign exchange
    June 15, 2013
    Jiah Khan may have been pushed over the edge because of her tumultuous love life but her sluggish career after a big start is said to have caused her…
  • To serve with love
    June 15, 2013
    A film that bagged an award at Cannes this year tells of a love story aided unwittingly by the noted 'dabbawallas' of Mumbai.
More in this Section
Profiles
Leaving tiger watching to raise rice Ecologist Debal Deb, who did his post-doctoral research from IISc in…
The crorepati writer He's the man who gives Big B his lines. RD Tailang, the writer of KBC.
Chennai-Toronto express Review Raja is a Canadian enthusiast whose quirky video reviews of Tamil…
Don't parrot, perform Maestro Buddhadev Dasgupta will hold a masterclass on ragas.
A man's man Shivananda Khan spent his life speaking up for men who have sex with men.
Bhowmick and the first family of Indian football At first glance, it would be the craziest set-up in professional football.
From Times Blogs
The end of Detroit
Jobs in Detroit's car factories are moving to India.
Chidanand Rajghatta
How I love the word ‘dobaara’...
Can ‘bindaas’ or ‘jhakaas’ survive transliteration?
Shobhaa De
Anand marte nahin...
India's first superstar died almost a lonely life.
Robin Roy
Cinema

Full screen

|


Previous
<b>O U T O N DV D </b><br><br><b>DHOBI GHAT (2010) </b><br><br><b>Language: Hindi </b><br><br><b>Director: Kiran Rao </b><br><br><b>Cast: Aamir Khan, Prateik Babbar, Monica Dogra, Kriti Malhotra </b><br><br>Mumbai, one of the most populous cities in the world, also plays mother to among the largest number of films made annually in any city. Though artists thrive in its cosmopolitan multiculturalism, not many have been able to get intimate with the constantly churning city. Debutante Kiran Rao manages just this miracle with Dhobi Ghat - the best cinematic character sketch of Mumbai and its people so far. <br>Dhobi Ghat is the story of five characters. While four of them - Yasmin, Arun, Shai and Munna are constantly looking into one another, searching for love, lust or inspiration, the fifth character is the city itself that simply watches over them without comment or prejudice. <br>The metaphors of the film make it an absolute delight to watch again and again. For instance, the character of an old woman who says nothing but observes everything becomes an allegory for Mumbai. Hundreds of thousands throng the city every year, chasing dreams. <br>To give a representation to a cross section of them in a span of 90 minutes show's Kiran Rao's cinematic skills. Aamir Khan, a stickler for perfection, pays special attention to this DVD. He gives perfect value for money with special features that not only include deleted scenes, but also the film's making, audition tapes of the actors and a special audio track called "DVS Blind & Low Vision" - a track that gives scene descriptions and is meant for visually challenged people.

Full screen

Satyen K Bordoloi | January 14, 2012


O U T O N DV D

DHOBI GHAT (2010)

Language: Hindi

Director: Kiran Rao

Cast: Aamir Khan, Prateik Babbar, Monica Dogra, Kriti Malhotra

Mumbai, one of the most populous cities in the world, also plays mother to among the largest number of films made annually in any city. Though artists thrive in its cosmopolitan multiculturalism, not many have been able to get intimate with the constantly churning city. Debutante Kiran Rao manages just this miracle with Dhobi Ghat - the best cinematic character sketch of Mumbai and its people so far.
Dhobi Ghat is the story of five characters. While four of them - Yasmin, Arun, Shai and Munna are constantly looking into one another, searching for love, lust or inspiration, the fifth character is the city itself that simply watches over them without comment or prejudice.
The metaphors of the film make it an absolute delight to watch again and again. For instance, the character of an old woman who says nothing but observes everything becomes an allegory for Mumbai. Hundreds of thousands throng the city every year, chasing dreams.
To give a representation to a cross section of them in a span of 90 minutes show's Kiran Rao's cinematic skills. Aamir Khan, a stickler for perfection, pays special attention to this DVD. He gives perfect value for money with special features that not only include deleted scenes, but also the film's making, audition tapes of the actors and a special audio track called "DVS Blind & Low Vision" - a track that gives scene descriptions and is meant for visually challenged people.

<b>WO R L D LY W I S E </b><br><br><b>RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (2011) </b><br><br><b>Language: English </b><br><br><b>Director: Rupert Wyatt </b><br><br><b>Cast: James Franco, Andy Serkis, Freida Pinto </b><br><br>Most Hollywood directors make cinema to showcase special effects. Not Rupert Wyatt. He knows that computer-generated imagery or CGI has to be at the service of cinema. <br>Secondly prevalent logic would have him remake the most popular film of a series. Instead, he picks up the fourth part from the Planet Of The Apes series to create a tale that is as emotionally fulfilling as it is technically awe-inspiring. <br>Caesar, a genetically modified ape, is secretly raised by scientist Will. He grows up with intelligence exceeding humans but after witnessing the injustice meted out to his kind he unifies apes against ruthless humans. <br>Despite a predictable progression, its many parallels and metaphors make Rise of the Planet of the Apes a sheer delight. In Caesar, we have the representation of a typical revolutionary, with one difference - his humanism and regard for life is greater. His core beats with love for his ape-kind and not hatred of those who brutalise his kind. <br>Caesar, thus, becomes a satire on most humans on the planet. Those who are sensitive will never take animals for granted. Frieda Pinto has a role just a shade longer than that of a cameo. However, it is Andy Serkis who gives Caesar his emotions through his expressions. The DVD's special features show how they did it. It's a must-own DVD for both discerning viewers and fans of CGI.

Full screen

Satyen K Bordoloi | January 14, 2012


WO R L D LY W I S E

RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (2011)

Language: English

Director: Rupert Wyatt

Cast: James Franco, Andy Serkis, Freida Pinto

Most Hollywood directors make cinema to showcase special effects. Not Rupert Wyatt. He knows that computer-generated imagery or CGI has to be at the service of cinema.
Secondly prevalent logic would have him remake the most popular film of a series. Instead, he picks up the fourth part from the Planet Of The Apes series to create a tale that is as emotionally fulfilling as it is technically awe-inspiring.
Caesar, a genetically modified ape, is secretly raised by scientist Will. He grows up with intelligence exceeding humans but after witnessing the injustice meted out to his kind he unifies apes against ruthless humans.
Despite a predictable progression, its many parallels and metaphors make Rise of the Planet of the Apes a sheer delight. In Caesar, we have the representation of a typical revolutionary, with one difference - his humanism and regard for life is greater. His core beats with love for his ape-kind and not hatred of those who brutalise his kind.
Caesar, thus, becomes a satire on most humans on the planet. Those who are sensitive will never take animals for granted. Frieda Pinto has a role just a shade longer than that of a cameo. However, it is Andy Serkis who gives Caesar his emotions through his expressions. The DVD's special features show how they did it. It's a must-own DVD for both discerning viewers and fans of CGI.

<b>O U T O N DV D </b><br><br><b>BOL (2011) </b><br><br><b>Language: Urdu </b><br><br><b>Director: Shoaib Mansoor </b><br><br><b>Cast: Humaima Malick, Manzar Sehbai, Atif Aslam </b><br><br>Pakistan, in contrast to India, barely makes a handful of films annually. Hence, to see a Pakistani film put most commercial Indian cinema to shame is embarrassing. A woman sentenced to death recounts her story of growing up in the shadow of an oppressive father who denies his girls their fundamental rights. <br>The politics of Bol is the politics of the personal. It strips naked the structural violence of a patriarchal society governed by excessive religiosity. It's a delight to see a film take up so many issues - women's emancipation, education, religiosity, transsexualism etc - yet not lose focus on any. <br>But for a stellar cast, Bol would have faltered. Humaima Malick aptly portrays an angst-ridden girl itching to do the right thing. Manzar Sehbai playing an obnoxiously religious, chauvinist and hypocritical patriarch of the family provides a template for closed-minded men everywhere. Replace him with a Hindu Chaudhury in Haryana and the film would hold, frame for every frame. After all, the treatment of women in India, which has the highest female infanticide rate, is often worse than in Pakistan. <br>Bol's main problem is melodrama. Yet, rarely in the recent cinema of the subcontinent has melodrama been employed so well and for such good causes. The DVD sadly only carries the film. It could have included a documentary to truly show the life of women in a patriarchal society.

Full screen

Satyen K Bordoloi | January 14, 2012


O U T O N DV D

BOL (2011)

Language: Urdu

Director: Shoaib Mansoor

Cast: Humaima Malick, Manzar Sehbai, Atif Aslam

Pakistan, in contrast to India, barely makes a handful of films annually. Hence, to see a Pakistani film put most commercial Indian cinema to shame is embarrassing. A woman sentenced to death recounts her story of growing up in the shadow of an oppressive father who denies his girls their fundamental rights.
The politics of Bol is the politics of the personal. It strips naked the structural violence of a patriarchal society governed by excessive religiosity. It's a delight to see a film take up so many issues - women's emancipation, education, religiosity, transsexualism etc - yet not lose focus on any.
But for a stellar cast, Bol would have faltered. Humaima Malick aptly portrays an angst-ridden girl itching to do the right thing. Manzar Sehbai playing an obnoxiously religious, chauvinist and hypocritical patriarch of the family provides a template for closed-minded men everywhere. Replace him with a Hindu Chaudhury in Haryana and the film would hold, frame for every frame. After all, the treatment of women in India, which has the highest female infanticide rate, is often worse than in Pakistan.
Bol's main problem is melodrama. Yet, rarely in the recent cinema of the subcontinent has melodrama been employed so well and for such good causes. The DVD sadly only carries the film. It could have included a documentary to truly show the life of women in a patriarchal society.

Next
Other Times Group news sites
The Times of India | The Economic Times
इकनॉमिक टाइम्स | ઈકોનોમિક ટાઈમ્સ
Mumbai Mirror | Times Now
Indiatimes | नवभारत टाइम्स
महाराष्ट्र टाइम्स
Living and entertainment
Timescity | iDiva | Bollywood | Zoom
| Technoholik | MensXP.com

Networking

itimes | Dating & Chat | Email
Hot on the Web
Hotklix
Services
Book print ads | Online shopping | Business solutions | Book domains | Web hosting
Business email | Free SMS | Free email | Website design | CRM | Tenders | Remit
Cheap air tickets | Matrimonial | Ringtones | Astrology | Jobs | Property | Buy car
Online Deals
About us | Advertise with us | Terms of Use and Grievance Redressal Policy | Privacy policy | Feedback
Copyright© 2010 Bennett, Coleman & Co. Ltd. All rights reserved. For reprint rights: Times Syndication Service