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Prophecies

Doomsdays that never were



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<b>HAL LINDSEY'S PROPHECY, 1980s </b><br><br>In 1970, American evangelist Hal Lindsey wrote the bestselling The Late, Great Planet Earth, in which he predicted the end of the world in the 1980s. That never happened, but it made the former Mississippi river tugboat captain famous. Lindsey went on to write several books, was invited to speak at the Pentagon, and still appears regularly on TV shows

Doomsdays that never were

December 15, 2012


HAL LINDSEY'S PROPHECY, 1980s

In 1970, American evangelist Hal Lindsey wrote the bestselling The Late, Great Planet Earth, in which he predicted the end of the world in the 1980s. That never happened, but it made the former Mississippi river tugboat captain famous. Lindsey went on to write several books, was invited to speak at the Pentagon, and still appears regularly on TV shows

<b>THE JUPITER EFFECT, 1982 </b><br><br>In this 1974 book, scientists John Gribbin and Stephen Plagemann claimed that on March 10, 1982, a unique planetary alignment could create a gravitational pull leading to killer earthquakes and severe climate change. When nothing happened on the appointed day, the authors wrote another book - Jupiter Effect Reconsidered

Doomsdays that never were

December 15, 2012


THE JUPITER EFFECT, 1982

In this 1974 book, scientists John Gribbin and Stephen Plagemann claimed that on March 10, 1982, a unique planetary alignment could create a gravitational pull leading to killer earthquakes and severe climate change. When nothing happened on the appointed day, the authors wrote another book - Jupiter Effect Reconsidered

<b>NOSTRADAMUS, 1999 </b><br><br>While 'scholars' say the accuracy of the famous 16th-century French seer's 'prophecies' depends heavily on interpretation, that 'fact' hasn't deterred legions of believers. One quatrain, which goes, "The year 1999, seventh month / From the sky will come great king of terror, " was seen to foretell the end. When the world didn't end, believers went back to interpreting it 'correctly'

Doomsdays that never were

December 15, 2012


NOSTRADAMUS, 1999

While 'scholars' say the accuracy of the famous 16th-century French seer's 'prophecies' depends heavily on interpretation, that 'fact' hasn't deterred legions of believers. One quatrain, which goes, "The year 1999, seventh month / From the sky will come great king of terror, " was seen to foretell the end. When the world didn't end, believers went back to interpreting it 'correctly'

<b>LARGE HADRON COLLIDER, 2008 </b><br><br>Some speculated that the much-awaited and highprofile activation of CERN's Large Hadron Collider in a tunnel on the Franco-Swiss border would create instability and lead to a black hole that would swallow up the Earth. In 2008, some scientists even filed a lawsuit asking that the experiment be stopped. But the LHC was switched on. Last heard from, it appears to be working rather well and continues to help us push the frontiers of particle physics

Doomsdays that never were

December 15, 2012


LARGE HADRON COLLIDER, 2008

Some speculated that the much-awaited and highprofile activation of CERN's Large Hadron Collider in a tunnel on the Franco-Swiss border would create instability and lead to a black hole that would swallow up the Earth. In 2008, some scientists even filed a lawsuit asking that the experiment be stopped. But the LHC was switched on. Last heard from, it appears to be working rather well and continues to help us push the frontiers of particle physics

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